TRAVEL BLOG

Albania – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to Albania due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Albania due to crime.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Albania due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Your risk of contracting COVID-19 and developing severe symptoms may be lower if you are fully vaccinated with an FDA authorized vaccine. Before planning any international travel, please review the CDC’s specific recommendations for fully vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers

Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 and related restrictions and conditions in Albania.

Exercise increased caution in:

  • The southern town of Lazarat due to crime.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Albania:

Lazarat-Exercise Increased Caution

The security situation in Lazarat remains volatile due to crime and violence associated with marijuana cultivation. Local police have limited ability to protect and assist travelers.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Lazarat as U.S government employees are prohibited from traveling there.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Brazil – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel to Brazil due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Brazil due to crime. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Brazil due to COVID-19, indicating a high level of COVID-19 in the country. Your risk of contracting COVID-19 and developing severe symptoms may be lower if you are fully vaccinated with an FDA authorized vaccine. Before planning any international travel, please review the CDC’s specific recommendations for vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers. Travelers to Brazil may experience border closures, travel prohibitions, stay at home orders, business closures, and other emergency conditions within Brazil due to COVID-19. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Brazil.

Do not travel to:

  • Any areas within 150 km/100 miles of Brazil’s land borders with Venezuela, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, and Paraguay due to crime. (Note: This does not apply to the Foz do Iguacu National Park or Pantanal National Park.)
  • Informal housing developments (commonly referred to in Brazil as favelas, vilas, comunidades, and/or conglomerados) at any time of day due to crime (see additional information below).
  • Brasilia’s administrative regions (commonly known as “satellite cities”) of Ceilandia, Santa Maria, Sao Sebastiao, and Paranoa during non-daylight hours due to crime (see additional information below).

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as murder, armed robbery, and carjacking, is common in urban areas, day and night. Gang activity and organized crime is widespread. Assaults are common. U.S. government personnel are discouraged from using public, municipal buses in all parts of Brazil due to an elevated risk of robbery and assault at any time of day, and especially at night.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Brazil:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19.
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.  
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Avoid walking on beaches after dark.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Use caution at, or going to, major transportation centers or on public transportation, especially at night. Passengers face an elevated risk of robbery or assault using public, municipal bus transportation throughout Brazil.
  • Use increased caution when hiking in isolated areas.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Brazil.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

International Borders – Do Not Travel

U.S. government personnel are not permitted to travel to areas within 150 km/100 miles of the international land borders with Venezuela, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, and Paraguay without advance approval from security officials due to crime. Travel to the Foz do Iguacu National Park and Pantanal National Park is permitted.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Informal Housing Developments (commonly known as “Favelas”) – Do Not Travel

Do not travel to informal housing developments (commonly referred to in Brazil as favelas, vilas, comunidades, and/or conglomerados), even on a guided tour. Neither the tour companies nor the police can guarantee your safety when entering these communities. Even in these communities that the police or local governments deem safe, the situation can change quickly and without notice. While some informal housing developments have clear boundaries or gates, or even names such as “favela”, “vila”, “comunidade”, or “conglomerado”, other such developments may be less obvious, and may be identified by crowded quarters, poorer conditions, and/or irregular construction. In addition, exercise caution in areas surrounding these communities, as occasionally, inter-gang fighting and confrontations with police move beyond the confines of these communities. Except under limited circumstances and with advance approval, U.S. government personnel are not permitted to enter any informal housing developments in Brazil. Read the Safety and Security Section on the country information page for further information regarding favelas.

Visit our website for Travel High-Risk Areas.

Brasilia’s Administrative Regions (commonly known as “Satellite Cities”) – Do Not Travel

Without advance approval from security officials, U.S. government personnel are not permitted to travel to Brasilia’s Administrative Regions of Ceilandia, Santa Maria, Sao Sebastiao, and Paranoa between the hours of 6:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. (non-daylight hours) due to crime.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Netherlands – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel to the Netherlands due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution due to terrorism.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for the Netherlands due to COVID-19, indicating a- high level of COVID-19 in the country. Your risk of contracting COVID-19 and developing severe symptoms may be lower if you are fully vaccinated with an FDA authorized vaccine. Before planning any international travel, please review the CDC’s specific recommendations for fully vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers.

Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 related restrictions and conditions in the Netherlands

Terrorists continue plotting possible attacks in the Netherlands. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to the Netherlands:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and large crowded public venues.
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities including movement restrictions related to any ongoing police action.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for the Netherlands.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Guinea-Bissau – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel to Guinea-Bissau due to COVID-19, crime, and civil unrest

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Guinea-Bissau due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Your risk of contracting COVID-19 and developing severe symptoms may be lower if you are fully vaccinated with an FDA authorized vaccine. Before planning any international travel, please review the CDC’s specific recommendations for vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers.

Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 and related restrictions and conditions in Guinea-Bissau.

Country Summary: Non-violent crime is common in Guinea-Bissau. Aggressive vendors, panhandlers, and occasionally criminals target foreigners at the Bissau airport and other crowded areas, especially Bandim Market in the center of the capital. Local police lack the resources, capacity, and training to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents.

The country has been beset by chronic political and institutional dysfunction for decades, and there is the potential for violence.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens because there is no U.S. Embassy in Guinea-Bissau.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Guinea-Bissau:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s webpage regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.   
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Only travel during daylight.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events, and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Make contingency plans to leave the country.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Guinea-Bissau.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Bahrain – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel to Bahrain due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3Travel Health Notice for Bahrain due to COVID-19, indicating a high level of COVID-19 in the country. Your risk of contracting COVID-19 and developing severe symptoms may be lower if you are fully vaccinated with an FDA authorized vaccine. Before planning any international travel, please review the CDC’s specific recommendations for vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers.

Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 and related restrictions and conditions in Bahrain.

Read the country information page.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman region, including Bahrain, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an advisory Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

If you decide to travel to Bahrain:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Brunei – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel to Brunei due to COVID-19 and related travel restrictions.                    

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Brunei for COVID-19, indicating a high level of COVID-19 in the country. Your risk of contracting COVID-19 and developing severe symptoms may be lower if you are fully vaccinated with an FDA authorized vaccine. Before planning any international travel, please review the CDC’s specific recommendations for vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers.

Brunei currently requires U.S. citizens to obtain permission and sponsorship before entering due to COVID-19. Furthermore, travelers arriving indirectly from the United States are subject to a 14-day quarantine and at least one COVID-19 test at the traveler’s expense. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 and related restrictions and conditions in Brunei.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Brunei:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Bosnia and Herzegovina – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel to Bosnia and Herzegovina due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Bosnia and Herzegovina due to terrorism and land mines.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Minefields and land mines are present throughout Bosnia and Herzegovina. While suspected hazardous areas are normally clearly marked, several people are killed or injured each year.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Bosnia and Herzegovina due to COVID-19, indicating a high level of COVID-19 in the country. Your risk of contracting COVID-19 and developing severe symptoms may be lower if you are fully vaccinated with an FDA authorized vaccine. Before planning any international travel, please review the CDC’s specific recommendations for fully vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers.

Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 and related restrictions and conditions in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Bosnia and Herzegovina:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Dominica – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to Dominica due to COVID-19 .              

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Dominica  due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Your risk of contracting COVID-19 and developing severe symptoms may be lower if you are fully vaccinated with an FDA authorized vaccine. Before planning any international travel, please review the CDC’s specific recommendations for vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Dominica.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Dominica:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Turkey – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to Turkey due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution when traveling to Turkey due to terrorism and arbitrary detentions. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Turkey due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Your risk of contracting COVID-19 and developing severe symptoms may be lower if you are fully vaccinated with an FDA authorized vaccine. Before planning any international travel, please review the CDC’s specific recommendations for fully vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers.

Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 and related restrictions and conditions in Turkey.

Do not travel to:

  • Sirnak province, Hakkari province, and any area within six miles (ten kilometers) of the Syrian border due to terrorism. (Level 4)

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Turkey. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Security forces have detained tens of thousands of individuals, including U.S. citizens, for alleged affiliations with terrorist organizations based on scant or secret evidence and grounds that appear to be politically motivated. U.S. citizens have also been subject to travel bans that prevent them from departing Turkey. Participation in demonstrations not explicitly approved by the Government of Turkey, as well as criticism of the government (including on social media) can result in arrest.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Turkey:

Sirnak Province, Hakkari Province, and Any Arewithin six miles (ten kilometers) of the Syrian Border – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to Sirnak province, Hakkari province, or any area within six miles (ten kilometers) of the Turkey/Syria border due to the continued threat of attacks by terrorist groups, armed conflict, and civil unrest. Terrorist attacks, including suicide bombings, ambushes, car bomb detonations, and improvised explosive devices, as well as shootings, and illegal roadblocks leading to violence have occurred in these areas. U.S. government employees are restricted from traveling to these provinces and to any area within six miles (ten kilometers) of the Turkey/Syria border without prior approval.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Uruguay – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel to Uruguay due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Uruguay, indicating a high level of COVID-19 in the country. Your risk of contracting COVID-19 and developing severe symptoms may be lower if you are fully vaccinated with an FDA authorized vaccine. Before planning any international travel, please review the CDC’s specific recommendations for vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Uruguay.

Violent crimes, such as homicides, armed robberies, car jackings, and thefts occur throughout the country and in urban areas frequented by U.S. government personnel, day and night. Criminals commonly travel in pairs on motorcycles to approach unsuspecting victims with a weapon and demand personal belongings. Armed criminals also target grocery stores, restaurants, financial centers, and small businesses, in which innocent bystanders are often victimized.

Please read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Uruguay:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Be aware of your surroundings especially when traveling to tourist locations or poorly lit areas.
  • Call 911 if you encounter a crime in progress. Do not physically resist any robbery attempt or try to stop a robbery in progress.
  • Be vigilant when visiting banks or using ATMs during non-daylight hours or in remote locations; criminals often target ATMs and businesses in the early morning hours.
  • Do not leave valuable objects in parked vehicles or in plain sight when driving.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive jewelry or watches.
  • Review your personal and residential security plans.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Uruguay.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations; review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.